Corked Wine: What Does It Mean?

Corked Wine: What Does It Mean?

Years ago, a friend and I started a wine blog for wine newbies. It’s no longer around, but I do still try to keep up its Facebook page, Have Wine, Will Drink. We answered all kinds of questions about wine, and we wrote our wine reviews in layman’s terms. Wine doesn’t have to be snobby – it should be fun and approachable, and it should be shared!

If you’re new to wine, you probably have lots of questions about it, and so I’d like to answer some common ones here. One question we never answered that’s a pretty common you you might hear is about corked wine. Maybe you’ve heard someone say “Yuck! This wine is corked!” Do you know what it means?

What does it mean when someone talks about corked wine? It doesn't mean that there's cork pieces in the wine! Get the answer this & other common wine questions.

Corked Wine: What Does It Mean?

Now you might think that “a corked wine” means that there’s cork floating around in the wine, but that’s not the right answer. When someone talks about a corked wine, what they mean is that the wine has become contaminated because of cork taint. Cork taint has a very distinct taste and smell, and if you ever taste corked wine, you will know it immediately!

According to VinePairCork is a natural substance, little microorganisms often like to eat it, either while it’s still part of the tree or after it’s been turned into a wine cork. In small instances, these airborne fungi come in contact with the cork and create a substance known as TCA. As soon as wine comes in contact with the TCA, it immediately spoils the wine. To me, corked wine tastes very acidy and sharp and you may even taste cork. It smells weird too – something similar to old, wet paper.

So what do you do if you get a corked wine? Put the cork back in and take it back to where you bought it. Most places will refund your money or replace the bottle for you.

Wine Tip: If you buy wines with a screw cap or synthetic cork, you never have to worry about your wine being corked!

I’ve covered a few other basic wine questions like:
What Is A Wine Aerator?
How Long Does An Open Bottle Of Wine Stay Good For?
What Are Tannins?

You’ll find lots more about wine, including recipes (Champagne jello shots, anyone?), wine reviews, and fun wine products (like a wine glass that tells you how many calories your drinking) here.

Love wine? Follow my Happy Hour board on Pinterest where you’ll find lots of recipes, information, and fun stuff about wine and more!

Follow Natalie Hoage – Mommy of a Monster’s board Happy Hour on Pinterest.

Do you have any questions about wine you’d like to have answered? Leave a comment below and I’ll answer it on an upcoming Wino Wednesday!

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What are Tannins?

I love wine. I love talking about wine. And I love teaching others about wine! Here’s a question that a lot of people ask: What are tannins?

What Are Tannins?

Love wine but don't know much about it? Here's a question that's asked often: What are tannins? I have the answer for you! What are tannins? Well, you don’t actually taste tannins – they are responsible for mouthfeel, or the way your mouth feels when you drink wine. Tannins contribute two characteristics to red wine’s flavor, astringency and bitterness. You know what bitter is since it’s one of our five tastes.

But when we talk about tannins and astringency, what we mean is that tannins may taste astringent because they bind with salivary proline-rich proteins and precipitate them out. So if tannins are very astrigent, you may feel a sense of roughness or dryness in your mouth. Think about it like this: if you allow a teabag to steep in a cup of water for 30 seconds and taste it, it will taste much different than if you let it steep for 5 minutes because of astringency.

If your mouth puckers or your tongue curls when you taste a particular wine, that’s the tannins! I’ve now answered the question what are tannins, and I hope it makes sense!

I’ve covered a few other basic wine questions like:
What Is A Wine Aerator?
How Long Does An Open Bottle Of Wine Stay Good For?
What Does Corked Wine Mean?

You’ll find lots more about wine, including recipes (Champagne jello shots, anyone?), wine reviews, and fun wine products (like a wine glass that tells you how many calories your drinking) here.

Love wine? Follow my Happy Hour board on Pinterest where you’ll find lots of recipes, information, and fun stuff about wine and more!

Follow Natalie Hoage – Mommy of a Monster’s board Happy Hour on Pinterest.

Do you have any questions about wine you’d like to have answered? Leave a comment below and I’ll answer it on an upcoming Wino Wednesday!

How Long Does Opened Wine Stay Good For?

How Long Does Opened Wine Stay Good For

A question that I’m always asked about wine is this: how long does opened wine stay good for? The short answer is it depends. Lots of factors play into this including age of the bottle of wine and the wine’s varietal.

The long answer to how long does opened wine stay good for is a bit more complicated. One thing is for sure: once you’ve taken the cork out of a bottle of wine and exposed it to oxygen (wine’s natural enemy), it starts to deteriorate quickly.

So here’s the answer: drink the whole bottle and then you don’t have to worry about it. I’m kidding, I’m kidding!

How Long Does Opened Wine Stay Good For?

Here’s the real answer to the question how long does opened wine stay good for: generally speaking, pop the cork back into the bottle or screw the lid back on and it will keep for a couple of days before you will notice its flavor start to deteriorate. If you put it in the fridge, you may be able to drink if for a week or so. Fortified wines (wines like Port or Sherry) might keep a little longer, but not much.

If you can finish the bottle within a couple of days, you’ll be fine. If you won’t be able to drink it, you can use leftovers in cooking. Check out KludgyMom’s Drunken Risotto recipe or my Steaks With Bacon Bourbon Sauce to use the rest of your red wine and Changeling Chicken recipe to finish off your white wine!

One more thing on the subject…even if your wine gets too old to drink and enjoy, if you do drink it, it won’t hurt you at all. It won’t taste good and will have no flavor, but it won’t become toxic.

But why buy a bottle that will go bad in just a few days when you can buy a box of wine that will last for weeks! More on that subject coming soon!

I’ve covered a few other basic wine questions like:
What Is A Wine Aerator?
How Long Does An Open Bottle Of Wine Stay Good For?
What Does Corked Wine Mean?

You’ll find lots more about wine, including recipes (Champagne jello shots, anyone?), wine reviews, and fun wine products (like a wine glass that tells you how many calories your drinking) here.

Love wine? Follow my Happy Hour board on Pinterest where you’ll find lots of recipes, information, and fun stuff about wine and more!

Follow Natalie Hoage – Mommy of a Monster’s board Happy Hour on Pinterest.

Do you have any questions about wine you’d like to have answered? Leave a comment below and I’ll answer it on an upcoming Wino Wednesday!

Wine With Friends For A Good Cause: My Hope At Home Wine Party

If there’s one thing you know I love, it’s wine. Back in February, I was lucky enough to host at HOPE at HOME wine party with some friends. I think you’ll recognize a few of them too! Now head over to HOPE at HOME to read my guest post there titled Good Friends, Good Wine, Good Cause!

And if you live in California and are interested in hosting a HOPE AT HOME party of your own, you can read all about how to host a HOPE at HOME event of your own!

Are you a fan of Scary Mommy? Want to win a copy of Jill’s book? Head over to read my review of Confessions of A Scary Mommy and find out how!